Beatrice Scaccia b. 1978

Beatrice Scaccia was born in Veroli, Italy to parents of Sicilian heritage.

 

Her visual works typically take the form of drawings, paintings and animations.

 

Scaccia earned a MFA at the Fine Art Academy in Rome. She also studied Animation at the SVA in NY.

 

She has had solo exhibitions at venues such as Ricco/Maresca Gallery, New York (2018); Crepaccio, Milan (2018); Artists Alliance Inc., New York (2014); and Ugo Ferranti Gallery, Rome (2010).

 

Her work has been included in group exhibitions at Magazzino Italian Art, New York (2020); Monica King Contemporary, New York (2020); Pen&Brush, New York (2020); The Center for the less Good Idea, Johannesburg (2020); Steven Harvey Fine Art Projects, New York (2017); American University’s Katzen Arts Center, Washington, D.C. (2016); Museo Arcos, Benevento (2014); among others.

 

Her work is present in many important public and private collections, included the William Louis-Dreyfus Foundation and the Portland Museum of Art.

 

In her practice, Scaccia amalgamates painting, drawing, animation and writing to construct multidimensional narratives that follow identity-fluid protagonists through ambiguously defined worlds. 

 

Her visual investigations are rooted in rigorous intellectual study and a deep understanding of materials and crafts. 

 

She creates characters, or their residues, as fluid beings that remain genderless, faceless, and ageless with only their most genuine vulnerabilities visible.  

 

Her work is typically large in scale, and has consisted of immersive installations, with sound, projections and looped gifs. 

 

Lately, she has focused mostly on painting and stop motion animation.

Scaccia is interested in representing the performative parade of our own reality. 

 

Through her paintings and her animations, she mixes cultures, genders, ages.

 

She plays with the lack of meaning that the excess of accessorizes creates, addressing the dualities embodied in cultural objects--including power and its limit, expression and suppression. 

 

Her artworks can be considered psychological. She links together a feeling of recognizability with surrealism. 

 

She associates playfulness with darkness, tenderness with uncanny, blending together residues of identities in quarantined worlds. 

 

Without being obvious, Scaccia presents the viewer with a dilemma that reflects on the idea of the nebulous, performative, and sometimes animalistic self.

 

She lives and works in New York.

 

Her work has been featured on The New York Times, Artnet News, Flash Art, The Art Newspaper, Domus, Marie Claire, Arte Mondadori, Drome Magazine, InsideArt, Art Fuse, Sole24Ore, Exibart, Atribune, Espoarte.